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=== The Road to "Images and Words" (1990-1992) ===
 
=== The Road to "Images and Words" (1990-1992) ===
   
Following Dominici's departure and the break from Mechanic Records, Dream Theater decided to first focus on getting a singer before signing another record contract. The band auditioned over 200 singers for the role, with some noteable people who either came very close to landing the job, or did for a short period. The first serious contender was [[John Arch]], formerly of the band [[Fates Warning]], who was a friend of the band. Arch, however, was not seriously interested in becoming a singer for Dream Theater, and auditioned as a favor to Portnoy. The second serious contender was [[Steve Hendricks]], who auditioned successfully and started working with the band. However, the band felt that he did not fit in with their image, despite having a great voice, and this was confirmed by a scout for [[East West Records|atCO Records]] who was courting the band at the time.
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Following Dominici's departure and the break from Mechanic Records, Dream Theater decided to first focus on getting a singer before signing another record contract. The band auditioned over 200 singers for the role, with some noteable people who either came very close to landing the job, or did for a short period. The first serious contender was [[John Arch]], formerly of the band [[Fates Warning]], who was a friend of the band. Arch, however, was not seriously interested in becoming a singer for Dream Theater, and auditioned as a favor to Portnoy. The second serious contender was [[Steve Hendricks]], who auditioned successfully and started working with the band. However, the band felt that he did not fit in with their image, despite having a great voice, and this was confirmed by a scout for [[atCO Records]] who was courting the band at the time.
   
 
The band's next successful suitor would be [[Steve Stone]], who worked with the band for some time in the studio, recording demos impressively. Stone was offered the job, which he accepted, becoming the band's new vocalist. However, this proved to be short lived. Stone's first and only live performance with the band in 1990 proved to be disastrous, as he attempted to sing three of the six songs the band performed, breaking his voice quickly and embarrassing the band with his on-stage persona. Although he was let go shortly after the show, Stone claims the break was mutual, and that he had already purchased a plane ticket back home. Portnoy recalls that Stone asked him for a ride to the airport, which angered him.
 
The band's next successful suitor would be [[Steve Stone]], who worked with the band for some time in the studio, recording demos impressively. Stone was offered the job, which he accepted, becoming the band's new vocalist. However, this proved to be short lived. Stone's first and only live performance with the band in 1990 proved to be disastrous, as he attempted to sing three of the six songs the band performed, breaking his voice quickly and embarrassing the band with his on-stage persona. Although he was let go shortly after the show, Stone claims the break was mutual, and that he had already purchased a plane ticket back home. Portnoy recalls that Stone asked him for a ride to the airport, which angered him.
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Shortly after the completion of Awake, Kevin Moore announced his intention to part from the band, leading to immediate personal friction between him and Portnoy, who felt that Moore's departure was badly timed, and left him out of the decision making process afterwards, leading Moore to critize the way the album was mixed, as the mix had no input from him. Moore would never re-unite with Dream Theater, despite being invited several times to appear at live shows, leading to more animosity between him and Portnoy, who felt increasingly insulted by Moore's dismissal of the band. Although the two would work together on a side project much later, [[OSI]], Portnoy would later leave this project due to creative differences.
 
Shortly after the completion of Awake, Kevin Moore announced his intention to part from the band, leading to immediate personal friction between him and Portnoy, who felt that Moore's departure was badly timed, and left him out of the decision making process afterwards, leading Moore to critize the way the album was mixed, as the mix had no input from him. Moore would never re-unite with Dream Theater, despite being invited several times to appear at live shows, leading to more animosity between him and Portnoy, who felt increasingly insulted by Moore's dismissal of the band. Although the two would work together on a side project much later, [[OSI]], Portnoy would later leave this project due to creative differences.
   
The album was released to critical success, though it received far less commercial success than its predecessor, although a single was released for "[[The Silent Man]]". A video was also shot for the song, directed by Portnoy, though it received virtually no airplay. Slightly more successful was the second single, "Lie", which the band recorded a performance video for without Kevin Moore. The album was still moderately successful, though its relatively poor returns compared to Images and Words led to friction with the record label, (now known as [[East West Records]]) who afterwords treated Dream Theater as a one-hit wonder. Fans, however, immediately took to the album, and it is considered to be one of their best albums by many fans.
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The album was released to critical success, though it received far less commercial success than its predecessor, although a single was released for "[[The Silent Man]]". A video was also shot for the song, directed by Portnoy, though it received virtually no airplay. Slightly more successful was the second single, "Lie", which the band recorded a performance video for without Kevin Moore. The album was still moderately successful, though its relatively poor returns compared to Images and Words led to friction with the record label, (now known as [[EastWest Records]]) who afterwords treated Dream Theater as a one-hit wonder. Fans, however, immediately took to the album, and it is considered to be one of their best albums by many fans.
   
 
The prospect of a tour proved difficult without a keyboardist, and without enough time to properly audition for the position, the band entered a scramble. One notable person who auditioned was [[Jens Johansson]], who would go on to become a member of the power metal band Stratovarius. Johansson claimed that he was offered the keyboardist position, however Portnoy has denied this, stating that he auditioned, but was never offered anything. The band sought out keyboardist [[Jordan Rudess]], who had come to their attention previously by beating Kevin Moore in a "best keyboardist" poll. Rudess agreed to audition, and he impressed the band greatly with both his prowess at playing keyboards as well as his usage of technology. Though he was offered the job, he turned it down, preferring a spot with [[The Dixie Dregs]], as touring with them would better accommodate the family he was starting, though Rudess did play a single show with the band.
 
The prospect of a tour proved difficult without a keyboardist, and without enough time to properly audition for the position, the band entered a scramble. One notable person who auditioned was [[Jens Johansson]], who would go on to become a member of the power metal band Stratovarius. Johansson claimed that he was offered the keyboardist position, however Portnoy has denied this, stating that he auditioned, but was never offered anything. The band sought out keyboardist [[Jordan Rudess]], who had come to their attention previously by beating Kevin Moore in a "best keyboardist" poll. Rudess agreed to audition, and he impressed the band greatly with both his prowess at playing keyboards as well as his usage of technology. Though he was offered the job, he turned it down, preferring a spot with [[The Dixie Dregs]], as touring with them would better accommodate the family he was starting, though Rudess did play a single show with the band.
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The second major change would be a line-up change. After working with Jordan Rudess on a side project, [[Liquid Tension Experiment (band)|Liquid Tension Experiment]] for two albums, Portnoy and Petrucci felt again that he was the perfect match for Dream Theater, and once again offered him the position, to which he accepted. This unfortunately left Derek Sherinian in a bad spot, as he had to be let go, despite not having done anything wrong and being a positive influence on the band through what is considered to be their darkest era. Sherinian, initially upset, has remained on good terms with Dream Theater, reuniting with them in 2004 for the 15th anniversary of "When Dream and Day Unite" to play as part of the encore. Sherinian has since used his short stint in Dream Theater as a launching pad to his own solo career, which has been successful.
 
The second major change would be a line-up change. After working with Jordan Rudess on a side project, [[Liquid Tension Experiment (band)|Liquid Tension Experiment]] for two albums, Portnoy and Petrucci felt again that he was the perfect match for Dream Theater, and once again offered him the position, to which he accepted. This unfortunately left Derek Sherinian in a bad spot, as he had to be let go, despite not having done anything wrong and being a positive influence on the band through what is considered to be their darkest era. Sherinian, initially upset, has remained on good terms with Dream Theater, reuniting with them in 2004 for the 15th anniversary of "When Dream and Day Unite" to play as part of the encore. Sherinian has since used his short stint in Dream Theater as a launching pad to his own solo career, which has been successful.
   
Upon returning to the studio to write and record their sixth album, which would become "[[Metropolis, Pt. 2: Scenes From a Memory]]", the band combined two ideas that had been kicking around for a while: The idea of doing a concept album, and the proposed sequel to "[[Metropolis—Part I: "The Miracle and the Sleeper"|Metropolis Part 1]]", which had at one point been recorded in rehearsal form with Sherinian, but never completed. Expanding on the concept of Metropolis, and with Portnoy and Petrucci producing the album themselves, "Scenes From A Memory"'s release is considered to be among the very best from the band. Doing financially better than its predecessors (other than "Images and Words") and being received extremely well by the fans, it is often considered by many to be the band's best album. The band for the first time since their debut did not record any videos for the songs, though a single was released for [[Through Her Eyes (album)|Through Her Eyes]].
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Upon returning to the studio to write and record their sixth album, which would become "[[Scenes From a Memory]]", the band combined two ideas that had been kicking around for a while: The idea of doing a concept album, and the proposed sequel to "[[Metropolis—Part I: "The Miracle and the Sleeper"|Metropolis Part 1]]", which had at one point been recorded in rehearsal form with Sherinian, but never completed. Expanding on the concept of Metropolis, and with Portnoy and Petrucci producing the album themselves, "Scenes From A Memory"'s release is considered to be among the very best from the band. Doing financially better than its predecessors (other than "Images and Words") and being received extremely well by the fans, it is often considered by many to be the band's best album. The band for the first time since their debut did not record any videos for the songs, though a single was released for [[Through Her Eyes (album)|Through Her Eyes]].
   
 
The tour for Scenes From A Memory proved to be every bit as successful as the album, with the band performing the entire album in full at each show, with an increasingly complex and nuanced stage production. The tour culminated in a show at The Roseland Ballroom in New York City, the final time the band would perform the album in its entirety (saving for certain shows much later in South America) as well almost a full concert's worth of older material, including such fan favorites as A Change of Seasons and [[Learning to Live]]. The concert's legendary length led to Portnoy almost being rushed to the hospital after vomiting at the end of the show, though this length would become standard for the band's live shows for a few years after this. The show was filmed and taped and was subject of three releases. The first release was the band's 3rd home video [[Metropolis 2000]] which only included the portion of the show where the band performed Scenes From A Memory, though a later DVD release would include several other songs as extras. The full concert would later be released on the band's next live album, "[[Live Scenes from New York]]", which contained CD-ROM footage of more video from the show. The entire show has never been released on video.
 
The tour for Scenes From A Memory proved to be every bit as successful as the album, with the band performing the entire album in full at each show, with an increasingly complex and nuanced stage production. The tour culminated in a show at The Roseland Ballroom in New York City, the final time the band would perform the album in its entirety (saving for certain shows much later in South America) as well almost a full concert's worth of older material, including such fan favorites as A Change of Seasons and [[Learning to Live]]. The concert's legendary length led to Portnoy almost being rushed to the hospital after vomiting at the end of the show, though this length would become standard for the band's live shows for a few years after this. The show was filmed and taped and was subject of three releases. The first release was the band's 3rd home video [[Metropolis 2000]] which only included the portion of the show where the band performed Scenes From A Memory, though a later DVD release would include several other songs as extras. The full concert would later be released on the band's next live album, "[[Live Scenes from New York]]", which contained CD-ROM footage of more video from the show. The entire show has never been released on video.
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==="A Dramatic Turn of Events" (2011 - 2012)===
 
==="A Dramatic Turn of Events" (2011 - 2012)===
Dream Theater recorded their 11th studio album, ''"A Dramatic Turn of Events"'', in Cove City Sound Studios in Glen Cove, New York from January 3rd to June 28th, 2011. It was released on September 12th 2011. The album was written entirely without Mike Mangini, and the parts were written with a drum machine. Jordan Rudess and John Myung contributed much more to the music writing than they had in recent years, with LaBrie writing lyrics for [[Far from Heaven]], Myung co-writing with Petrucci lyrics for [[Breaking All Illusions]], the first time since [[Scene Three: II. Fatal Tragedy|Fatal Tragedy]] in [[Metropolis, Pt. 2: Scenes From a Memory|Scenes From a Memory]] that he had done so. All other lyrics were written by Petrucci. The title of the album was inspired by the recurring lyrical themes about events that changed the course of history, notably the Libyan civial war. The lead single, [[On the Backs of Angels]], was released on June 29th, 2011, on September 14th a music video was released, and on January 26th, 2012, a lyric video for the second single, [[Build Me Up, Break Me Down]] was released on Loudwire. 
+
Dream Theater recorded their 11th studio album, ''"A Dramatic Turn of Events"'', in Cove City Sound Studios in Glen Cove, New York from January 3rd to June 28th, 2011. It was released on September 12th 2011. The album was written entirely without Mike Mangini, and the parts were written with a drum machine. Jordan Rudess and John Myung contributed much more to the music writing than they had in recent years, with LaBrie writing lyrics for [[Far from Heaven]], Myung co-writing with Petrucci lyrics for [[Breaking All Illusions]], the first time since [[Fatal Tragedy]] in [[Scenes From a Memory]] that he had done so. All other lyrics were written by Petrucci. The title of the album was inspired by the recurring lyrical themes about events that changed the course of history, notably the Libyan civial war. The lead single, [[On the Backs of Angels]], was released on June 29th, 2011, on September 14th a music video was released, and on January 26th, 2012, a lyric video for the second single, [[Build Me Up, Break Me Down]] was released on Loudwire. 
   
 
Petrucci felt he had a responsibility to fans following Portnoy's departure, and so some songs on the album have specific purposes. For example, On the Backs of Angels was a throwback to Dream Theater's signature sound, the heavy Build Me Up, Break Me Down was used to contrast the progressive aspects of the album, [[Outcry]] served as the album's anthem, [[Breaking All Illusions]] was an epic song that challenged traditional songwriting methods, and the closing track [[Beneath the Surface]] was the ballad.
 
Petrucci felt he had a responsibility to fans following Portnoy's departure, and so some songs on the album have specific purposes. For example, On the Backs of Angels was a throwback to Dream Theater's signature sound, the heavy Build Me Up, Break Me Down was used to contrast the progressive aspects of the album, [[Outcry]] served as the album's anthem, [[Breaking All Illusions]] was an epic song that challenged traditional songwriting methods, and the closing track [[Beneath the Surface]] was the ballad.
   
According to Jordan Rudess in an interview, he said the band underwent a musical change, re-evaluating and restructuring "who we are and what we do." In an interview for ''The Mirror'', Petrucci said the album,"tells a story... not literally but emotionally" and likened the experience to a "roller coaster ride." and LaBrie said that, musically,  the was melodically driven. Many people, including Rich Wilson in the Dream Theater biography [[Lifting Shadows]], say that the album is "spiritually reminiscient" of past albums like [[Images and Words]] and [[Metropolis, Pt. 2: Scenes From a Memory|Scenes From a Memory]]. Thiago Campos, a Brazilian musician and leader of a Dream Theater cover band on YouTube, went a step further saying that certain songs are structurally similar to counterparts on ''Images and Words'', for example the lead single, On the Backs of Angels, is almost structurally identical to the lead single from ''Images and Words'', [[Pull Me Under]].
+
According to Jordan Rudess in an interview, he said the band underwent a musical change, re-evaluating and restructuring "who we are and what we do." In an interview for ''The Mirror'', Petrucci said the album,"tells a story... not literally but emotionally" and likened the experience to a "roller coaster ride." and LaBrie said that, musically,  the was melodically driven. Many people, including Rich Wilson in the Dream Theater biography [[Lifting Shadows]], say that the album is "spiritually reminiscient" of past albums like [[Images and Words]] and [[Scenes From a Memory]]. Thiago Campos, a Brazilian musician and leader of a Dream Theater cover band on YouTube, went a step further saying that certain songs are structurally similar to counterparts on ''Images and Words'', for example the lead single, On the Backs of Angels, is almost structurally identical to the lead single from ''Images and Words'', [[Pull Me Under]].
   
 
=== "Dream Theater", Live at Luna Park, and "The Astonishing" (2013 - 2016) ===
 
=== "Dream Theater", Live at Luna Park, and "The Astonishing" (2013 - 2016) ===
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On January 6, 2014, John Petrucci said that Dream Theater are already "planting seeds for album No. 13". He commented: "There are some song ideas and little things like that -- nothing really official, but the seeds just start to get planted. One of the great things about this career is that you have the opportunity every time to go in and start again with a blank slate and think, 'What can we do differently? How can we make this better? Where can we go from here?' Every album has a story, and to constantly have a fresh opportunity to do it is really satisfying."
 
On January 6, 2014, John Petrucci said that Dream Theater are already "planting seeds for album No. 13". He commented: "There are some song ideas and little things like that -- nothing really official, but the seeds just start to get planted. One of the great things about this career is that you have the opportunity every time to go in and start again with a blank slate and think, 'What can we do differently? How can we make this better? Where can we go from here?' Every album has a story, and to constantly have a fresh opportunity to do it is really satisfying."
   
The band headed into the studio in February 2015 to record its thirteenth album. The album, titled ''[[The Astonishing]]'' was released on January 29, 2016. It is a concept album set in a dystopian future society devoid of real music, centering on a conflict between a group of rebels and an oppressive empire. Two singles, "[[The Gift of Music]]" and "[[Moment of Betrayal]]" were released on December 3, 2015 and January 22, 2016, respectively.
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The band headed into the studio in February 2015 to record its thirteenth album. The album, titled ''[[The Astonishing]]'' was released on January 29, 2016. It is a concept album set in a dystopian future society devoid of real music, centering on a conflict between a group of rebels and an oppressive empire. Two singles, "The Gift of Music" and "Moment of Betrayal" were released on December 3, 2015 and January 22, 2016, respectively.
   
 
===New label, 14th studio album (2017 - present)===
 
===New label, 14th studio album (2017 - present)===
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;Guitar World
 
;Guitar World
   
The album ''[[Metropolis, Pt. 2: Scenes From a Memory]]'' was ranked #95 on the magazine's list of the ''100 Greatest Guitar Albums of All Time''.
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The album ''[[Scenes from a Memory|Metropolis Pt. 2: Scenes from a Memory]]'' was ranked #95 on the magazine's list of the ''100 Greatest Guitar Albums of All Time''.
   
 
;Total Guitar
 
;Total Guitar
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